10 Native Scottish Animals And Where To Find Them Mineral Depletion of Post-Glacial Soil

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Mineral Depletion of Post-Glacial Soil

Feeding the soil with nutrients, to the organic vegetable gardener, often means putting organic waste materials, (wood cuttings, stems & uneaten leaves), back into the soil. But, if vegetable matter grows in poor soil, what does this mean for the long-term future of our homes and the crops that follow?

HOW ARE THE PARTICIPANTS OF THE PEOPLE AFFECTED?

When the last Ice Age receded, leaving behind the earth the remains of rocks, decaying animal & vegetable matter slowly combined with it over thousands of years to produce humus and soil containing minerals. We are at the end of the interglacial period and these minerals found in soil have been slowly used up, resulting in current mineral depletion levels averaging 70% in the last 50 years alone. Delta land, fed by rivers, produces abundant agricultural land because the minerals washed from the mountains or the land are constantly replenished with minerals by plants.

Of course, animals are also affected since the animals feed on plants that do not contain minerals. Ask any farmer why he is supplementing his animals, if their forage/silage is to be satisfactory, and he will say ‘Because the animals need it’. Farmers don’t want to spend money unnecessarily!

WARNING BELL.

In 1894 Dr. Julius Hensel wrote ‘Bread from Stones’, the first book on this subject. He argued that plants grown on mineral soils are stronger and more nutritious and that the increased capacity of the fertilizer industry is masking nutrient deficiencies. is mineral. A chiropractor, David Thomas, recently reviewed the data published by the MRC (Medical Research Council), Min. of Ag. & Fisheries, and by two authors of the Royal Society of Chemistry – RA McCance & EM Widdowson. The review is called ‘Study of the decline in mineral content of foods available to our country in the period 1940 to 1991’. Anyone interested in more details may want to look

[http://www.organicgarden.org.uk/min_dep_report.pdf]

Conclusions from this report read: 39% sodium, 72% copper, 59% zinc (important to human behavior & awareness), etc., all losses during the short period 1971-1991. Should we be eating 50 pieces, not just 5 pieces of fruit and vegetables every day! Since this is information released by the government, why are we not told about the dire situation of our land?

Although we seem to be eating more than adequate amounts of macro-nutrients (Fats, carbohydrates & protein) no one mentions the micro-nutrients (minerals & trace elements) that are essential to health. physical & mental. Please don’t get me wrong; no one with non-addictive habits in the West is dying from vitamin or mineral deficiency; RDA levels are calculated to prevent chronic diseases. The real questions are ‘what do we need for optimal health?’ and ‘what is the best health?’

THE SOLUTION.

Gardener & journalist Colin Shaw, writing in the magazine The Organic Way (named after the Henry Doubleday Research Association, of Ryton on Dunsmore) was impressed by the quality of the vegetables, which grew on very thin soil on a rock base on a barren the wind has taken over. Highland Scotland, at the SEER Centre, Pitlochrie, Scotland. The soil is not so good that it has to be produced using urban compost & rock dust, a by-product, 4:1 by volume. Of his visit there in late July, he commented “big & tasty strawberries, the garden is in full bloom…amazing to see such a healthy, productive garden in such a hostile situation”.

Rock dust comes from basalt quarries and is a corrosive waste product known as ‘quarry fines’. Analysis by the SEER Center shows around 70 minerals are available and are the best rock to use, although any source of volcanic rock is acceptable.

THE PROOF OF THE PUDDING…

Colin tried this method (1 bucket of rock dust to 1 barrow of compost) on his thin, newly acquired, garden in Derbyshire, building raised beds of the mixture. To his delight, the resulting plants are strong, healthy, disease-free, with no sign of blackfly beans all summer. He said that other studies have shown that the effect is growing over the years and he is looking forward to years 2 & 3 with interest.

As I often suffer from broadbean black spots & aphid damage, I will try this method as soon as I can!

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