2 Syllable Boy Names That Rhyme With An Animal An Analysis of William Blake’s ‘The Schoolboy’

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An Analysis of William Blake’s ‘The Schoolboy’

A cursory reading of William Blake’s ‘The Schoolboy’ gives the impression that its author opposes education. Yet upon closer examination Blake’s true argument is revealed: institutions that seek to educate children through strict discipline methods, creating a climate of fear that often stops children from learning. The poem is honest and brave, reflecting Blake’s own heartfelt concerns about helping children. A style of business language that is simple yet effective; sombre and melancholic tone.

‘The Schoolboy’ features six stanzas, each consisting of five lines. In the first stanza, a complex structure is established which has a strong effect on the rest of the poem. Having a small set of decisive factors, this system leaves the groundwork for two key comparisons, both of which appear more fully in the following stanzas. The natural world is clearly a source of inspiration for Blake, and features such as animals and plants – “birds” and “trees” in line 2 – are chosen as vehicles to represent the number of children. in later stanzas. The first stop stands a little apart from the others because its main concern is to establish a backdrop that depicts a herdsmanship where man lives in harmony with his natural environment on a privileged basis: ” the skylark sings with me” (line 4).

This harmony is broken at the beginning of stanza II where there is an immediate change in tone. On a formal level, the change is shown by the use of the word “But”, acting here as a link that connects the two stanzas. In terms of meaning it is clear in the change of scene, where the peaceful landscape is replaced by the front area of ​​the school room. Through repetition, both in “summer morning” in line 1 and to a lesser extent, “O” in line 2, Blake encourages the reader to make comparisons between the stanzas. The repetition of the phrase “summer morning” determines that the melody of this stanza will be similar to the first. Not only will the ABABB pattern be present, but similar chords will also appear. This is indeed the case with “morning” rhyming with the inverted word “outworn” in line 3. A similar rhythm is also put into effect by repeating the exclamatory “O”. As with the other stanzas, this stanza is loosely iambic, however the second occurrence of the verse syllable “O” encourages the reader to compare it with the line in the first stanza where it first appears. The phrase “what a sweet company!” follow him where he is born here is success by “he drives away all joy!” The effect of these formal similarities is to subtly enhance the stanzas’ verbal differences.

Description is very important in ‘The Schoolboy’, and in the third and fourth stanzas, the bird and plant vehicles established in stanza I come out effectively. Blake chose not to portray the students in a traditional figurative way, instead replacing any literal illustration with symbols from nature. The use of metaphor is clear with the word “drooping” in stanza III, where it evokes the image of a dead plant, yet it is more clear in stanza IV where the child is compared to the bird that was put in. It is argued that Blake sees the act of learning as having two sides. The first of these is acceptance, others expression. In stanza III he asks how a child can learn anything in such an environment: “Yes in my book he cannot be happy”, while in the following stanza he shows how their own self-expression is stifled, “Sit in the tent a bird. and sing?”

The last two stanzas show how the terrible education system has spoiled the child. In stanza V Blake indicates that he does not defy all authority figures by appealing to the child’s parents to heed his warnings (line 1). The poem presents some ominous images and ends on the ominous warning, “When the blasts of winter appear?” However when looking at it all it will appear that Blake is not against education – in the third place he talks about taking pleasure in a book – and the general impression that is conveyed is the idea of ​​a new kind of education based around nature rather than the classroom.

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