2 Who Is The Hardest Worker From Animal Farm Horse Training – 5 Reasons Your New Horse Is Behaving Badly and What You Can Do To Improve It Now

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Horse Training – 5 Reasons Your New Horse Is Behaving Badly and What You Can Do To Improve It Now

Q. I bought a nine-year-old mare about two weeks ago. He was supported at age 4 and didn’t do much until recently when he rode out across the fields to help round up the horses. When you first came to the farm it was great. He seems to be very confident and forward. She was a bit shocked when a car suddenly appeared from a corner – but nothing serious. I ride 1 or 2 times a week with another horse and then 1 or 2 days in the arena. But in the last two days you have not pushed yourself. She is in good health so I don’t think it’s a physical problem. I can’t get it off the ground so need a leg up. But he didn’t just stand still. He walks off and even swings his bum out of me so I have a fight to try and get up. When I finally got up I could feel him on edge and ready to go. So I have to take it back a little bit. He wouldn’t stop when I asked for either. If I slow down easily he gets angry and walks backwards or in circles. I don’t know what happened. I would really appreciate any advice.

A. It is not uncommon for behavioral and training issues to appear soon after buying a new horse and taking him to a new home. Here are five tips to help you and your horse start building a good relationship from the start.

1) Behavior is communication – The only way your horse can communicate is through his behavior. If you are exhibiting behaviors that you don’t like, don’t think that you are just being “naughty”. Pay attention to your behavior to understand how you feel. A horse that does not want to be handled in the paddock needs to develop more confidence before it is willing to greet you at the gate. A horse that does not want to stop to be ridden may be in pain from the wrong tack or not comfortable with how to be ridden. A horse that does not want to stand is troublesome and, like a flight animal, needs to move. Take the time to discover the reason(s) for your horse’s behavior rather than trying to “fix” the symptom. When you address the cause, the symptom will go away as a result.

2) Time Correction – Your new horse has been taken away from everything familiar to him and now has to adjust to a new environment, a new routine, a new herd and a new person. Imagine how you would feel in the same situation. It is important to give him some time to settle and get comfortable with all the changes in his life. You can help him by spending time with him so he can get to know you as you begin to build a relationship and develop self-confidence. Get to know your new horse from the ground up by grooming him, hand feeding him, petting him and hanging out with him for a few days.

3) Make a check – Getting to know your horse from the ground for the first few days is the perfect time to check that your tack fits well and is in a good position. Saddles and bits are not “one size fits all”. Physical pain or discomfort from improper posture, dental problems, muscle or joint injuries, or chiropractic issues cause behavioral and learning problems. Some of these physical problems may not be obvious in a routine vet exam. An equine sports therapist, massage therapist or chiropractor can identify problem areas, if any. A saddle fitter, a specialist can give you an assessment of your saddle fit, make adjustments to your saddle or help you find a saddle that fits you well. The cost of hiring any of these professionals (usually less than $100) is a small investment to ensure that your horse is comfortable and will not have behavioral problems due to pain along the way.

Make sure your bridle and bit also fit properly. The smaller ear band will compress and put pressure on the sensitive area at the base of the ears. Bits must be the right size and shape so they don’t pinch the sides of your mouth or tongue. If he shows signs of discomfort with little or no contact (ie. he has a busy or “stiff” mouth), have the vet give him a thorough dental exam to make sure his teeth are in good condition. it’s good

4) Review Study – A horse that has been riding for years can still be “green” depending on the level of training it received. If it hasn’t been given a good foundation, there will be gaps in your training that may not have been apparent when you did your test ride before buying it. If your horse has been ridden only by one or two people or by experienced riders, you may have difficulty understanding your cues and become confused. The more excited the horse is, the more it will be affected by even the smallest amount of tension, stiffness, imbalance or tightness in the rider. Do your first few rides in the arena or pen and take your rides slowly and calmly. Make sure you understand his cues and pay attention to any subtle signs that he’s feeling stressed or uncomfortable. Only when you are sure that your communication is working – both ways – should you increase what is asked of you.

5) Assistant Professor – Even Olympic level riders get some occasional training. Take lessons with an experienced instructor/trainer as often as you can. If there are no instructors in your area, check online for instructors who travel or provide video lessons; travel to a trainer who offers private training in their own company; or, participate in clinics that target your specific riding skills or discipline. Having “eyes on the ground” – even occasionally – will give you feedback on how you and your horse are progressing together. If you are facing a training problem you don’t know how to solve, getting help from an experienced trainer can help determine the root cause of your mare’s behavior and then work with both of you to solve it and prevent it from getting worse. . It often takes longer to “unlearn” a habit or habit than it does to learn a new habit.

By spending as much time as necessary to develop self-confidence, respect and trust with your new horse, and ensuring that he is safe, secure and comfortable in all aspects of his new life, you will be rewarded with Love, trust, and partner confidence.

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