5 Describe Two Differences Between Plant And Animal Mitosis Black Raspberries – Just the FAQs

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Black Raspberries – Just the FAQs

Talk to today’s medical scientists studying the disease-preventing properties of plant foods and most will tell you that the rising star is the black raspberry – one of Nature’s most powerful antioxidant fruits. .

Especially in the prevention of cancer, black raspberries are showing amazing effects as anti-cancer agents in laboratory research. In pursuit of this important discovery, in the past six years no other fruit has progressed as much to human clinical trials as the black raspberry.

Let’s take a look at the science and health basics for the benefits of including black raspberries in your diet.

How many species of black raspberries are usually available to the general consumer?

In Canada and the USA, there are two main species called Rubus occidentalis L. and Rubus eucodermis L. Rubus (a genus of plants in the family Rosaceae, family Rosoidea). Rubus is characterized by thorns that appear to grow along the vines that grow like irregular canes that are from one to four meters in length. It is customary to include black raspberries among other Rubus fruits (red raspberries, black berries, boysenberries, loganberries) as “brambleberries” or “brambleberries” that have grown natively in North America from recording session.

How is the black raspberry different from other Rubus species?

Often called “blackcaps” by berry farmers, black raspberries are the smallest and bluest of the Rubus berries. Scientific analyzes of blackcap phytochemicals reveal the most dense and highly pigmented North American plants – so strong that the US Department of Agriculture uses black raspberry juice as a stamp color on meats for many year. Scientific tests have described blackcaps with the best content of pigment antioxidants among North American berries (as described further below).

Where do blackcaps grow and what products are produced?

Black raspberries grow mainly in the western US and in British Columbia. They like cool, mild winters and humid, hot summers and are harvested in July. Oregon’s Willamette Valley, in particular, is noted for black raspberries accounting for 95% of the total US production or about 4 million pounds per year. Only 5% of black raspberries are sold fresh. Product for processing to provide a year’s supply of frozen (immediately quick frozen, IQF), pure juice products or concentrate is the rest.

What qualities do black raspberries attract customers?

The strong pigment qualities mentioned above come from the rich and diverse concentration of phenolic acid antioxidants in dark pigments. Phenolics give black raspberries many unique taste and chemical properties, including high acidity (pH up to 3.5), semi-sweet taste (brix up to 10 in IQF fruit, 17 in puree) and a special organic taste most interesting. people, including children. Blackcaps are very versatile in dessert recipes.

Over the past few years, research primarily at Ohio State University by Dr. Gary Stoner and colleagues has shown exciting – even surprising – results of black raspberry phenolic extracts and the whole berries themselves on colon and colon cancer. intramuscularly in experimental animals. The focus has been on the biological properties in particular of ellagic and ferulic acids (both phenolic antioxidants) from blackcaps.

Black raspberries are one of the most promising tools in the world from plant foods in the fight against cancer. They are now entering human clinical trials overseen by Dr. Stoner.

What are oxidants and antioxidants?

Every minute throughout our body’s cells, free radicals (ie, oxidants or free radicals) are constantly generated through normal metabolism. Exposure to toxins in the environment, or radiation, increases free radical production. Free radicals are unstable enemies that have the ability to damage cells and alter genes if not neutralized quickly.

Our bodies protect against oxidation by enzymes called dismutases, catalases, reductases and peroxidases. In addition, our food provides a host of chemicals that exert antioxidant effects. These chemicals include: vitamins A, C and E; minerals like selenium, manganese and zinc; and pigments from the plant foods we eat.

In black raspberries, phenolic pigments such as ellagic and ferulic acids are important antioxidant sources.

What other colors are there in black raspberries?

The rich color of black raspberries comes from many chemicals of the super-phenolic family which is a class of many thousands of members that act as pigments. The antioxidant power of black raspberries is measured by the intensity of the color from its pigments.

An important group of pigment phenolics is the flavonoid group that has a high concentration in dark colors. One class of flavonoids in particular – anthocyanins – accounts for most of the blue-red-black pigmentation of black raspberries. In addition to anthocyanins, however, are ellagic acid, ferulic acid, gallic acid, rutin and cyanidin glycosides (phenolics known by Dr. Stoner and colleagues as important anticarcinogens in blackcaps). Vitamin C, a universal killer, is also well concentrated in black raspberries (about 2 mg per 100 grams of fruit), as well as calcium (32 mg per 100 grams).

Is there a way to measure the antioxidant quality of plant food and how well do black raspberries do?

Yes, a test called ORAC (oxygen radical absorbing capacity) is performed on a food sample in a test tube. After all, the power of an antioxidant is measured by how well it removes free radicals.

At Oregon State University, black raspberries have been tested for ORAC against other berries and plant foods (first analyzed in the 2004 ORAC report by the US Department of Health). Black raspberries have the highest ORAC among other berries, fruits or vegetables analyzed about 3 times higher ORAC than black berries or red raspberries.

Plants with brown and white skins like pears and some apples have a low ORAC while dark fruits like black raspberries, blueberries and cranberries have a high ORAC.

What does high ORAC from black raspberries mean for health protection?

The answer to this question requires actual clinical research in humans (underway but still preliminary) but scientific evidence points to widespread protection against various diseases by eating a diet rich in high ORAC foods like black raspberries.

What are some diseases that come from free radicals and what can we do to combat oxidative stress?

Growing scientific evidence shows that almost every disease has free radicals to some extent. Cancer, heart and vascular disease, diabetes, inflammation and vascular disorders all have strong effects of oxidative stress. Improper aging and diseases of the elderly such as macular degeneration are thought to result from oxidative damage to cells as well.

Laboratory studies by Dr. Stoner point to the importance of oxidative factors in colon and colon cancer, and to the potential protective effect of phenolics from black raspberries or antioxidant-rich plant foods.

Consumers can enjoy the benefits of black berries in their meals while being protected from berry phenolics. Why wait for the positive results from the years of clinical research ahead? The prima facie evidence and delightful eating qualities of black raspberries should be enough to warrant including these berry treasures in your diet now.

Reading

* US National Library of Medicine, PubMed, http://pubmed.gov

* Oregon Raspberry and Blackberry Commission, http://www.oregon-berries.com

* Han C, Ding H, Casto B, Stoner GD, D’Ambrosio SM. Inhibition of growth of human oral cell lines that are abnormal and abnormal by extracts and components of black raspberries. Cancer Nutr. 2005;51(2):207-17.

* Casto BC, Kresty LA, Kraly CL, Pearl DK, Knobloch TJ, Schut HA, Stoner GD, Mallery SR, Weghorst CM. Chemoprevention of oral cancer by black raspberries. Anticancer Res. 2002 Nov-Dec; 22(6C): 4005-15.

Copyright 2006 Berry Health Inc.

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