5 Reasons Why We Should Bring Back Extinct Animals Global Warming – A Geological Perspective

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Global Warming – A Geological Perspective

Carbon-Silicate Environment.

A recent study by scientists at Columbia University has come up with an interesting way of removing atmospheric carbon, the aim is to reduce greenhouse gases and global warming. When CO2 comes into contact with peridotite, a common rock found in the Earth’s mantle, but more rarely on the surface, it turns into inert and solid minerals such as calcite. The Sultanate of Oman has a large amount of peridotite exposed on the surface and scientist Peter Kelemen and geochemist Juerg Matter say that the naturally occurring process can be a great potential to grow underground minerals that can store billions of tons two of CO2 emitted entirely by human activity every year. Source -Reuters/IOL Timothy Gardner

Al Gore has been campaigning for a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, and the Kyoto Protocol expired in 2012, and yet we are no closer to having any meaningful reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. However, I will not accept climate-change clusters at this stage, but will rather dwell on the extraordinary system which, in the long run, ensures that the Earth’s climate remains within certain limits which make the planet habitable – carbon -cyclic silicate.

We can have a negative impact on the climate over the course of centuries or even decades, but if we look at the issues from a geological point of view, these human returns that cause the hypothesis are accepted The greatness of the biological cycles is not important, and will not affect the long-term gestation of the planets. However, we can suffer a lot during these short-term fluctuations – an increase of 5 degrees will make many parts of our planet uninhabitable. A distorted sense of importance as a species makes us angry about our future on Planet Earth, but if we can accept that our past may be nothing more than a lucky roll of the evolutionary dice, and that the survival of the human race is not serious. to the planet’s future, then we can stop worrying about the role we think it plays in the grand scheme of the universe. Whether we like it or not, we will eventually perish, but life in a thousand different forms will continue until the supernova of the sun.

But let’s move on from knowledge and awareness to some hard facts about our immediate environment and how the Earth’s climate is within all those important limits. Most of us know about continental drift and plate tectonics, where the Earth’s crust is reworked by the subduction of plates along plate boundaries. The sinking plate descends into the fiery interior of the Earth where it is melted, and its constituent elements return to the rock cycle through volcanic action.

One of the most important elements in this cycle is calcium, which is widely used by organisms, including humans, to build shells and bones. Add some carbonic acid to the mixture and one gets the formation of calcium carbonate – CaCO3 – the most common form being limestones. Limestones are one of the most common sedimentary rocks and generally represent ancient coral reefs preserved in the geological record. The growth of our coral reefs sequestrates large quantities of carbon for millions, sometimes billions, of years until the limestones get up in the tectonic mill or become exposed to the agents of weathering and erosion. The more CO2 there is in the atmosphere, the faster the formation of limestone will occur, provided there is enough calcium.

The question is, what is the source of calcium? It comes from igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks brought to the surface by volcanic action due to plate tectonics. The same eruptions that release CO2 into the atmosphere provide the necessary chemical to remove it, thus keeping things in balance. Wow!

Now we need a source of carbonic acid. The weathering of silicates – feldspars and micas – in common rocks such as granites and sandstones produces calcium, silicon, water and all important carbonic acid. Now, as we’ve seen before, the more CO2 there is, the faster limestone forms, thus removing the same CO2 from the system. Likewise the higher the concentration of CO2, the warmer the planet gets – an unfortunate fact which was discovered to our cost. This leads to an increase in evaporation which leads to increased rainfall and an associated increase in weather.

The greater the amount of weathering, the greater the formation of carbonic acid, which in turn leads to faster cement production. This of course speeds up the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, ultimately cooling the planet. Cooling then slows the rate of weathering, carbon levels rise and the Earth warms again. What a wonderful, self-controlled, fantastic, system! But it takes more than a few decades or centuries to offset the differences in atmospheric carbon. It’s comforting perhaps to know that eventually high carbon levels in the atmosphere will be eliminated due to the carbon-silicate cycle, but certainly not within the immediate future. Using peridotite technology may be a temporary but expensive solution to remove carbon from the atmosphere, but it is clear that there is an efficient mechanism for doing this, although it will take several thousand years for those wheels to turn.

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