A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos Tiger Farming

You are searching about A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos, today we will share with you article about A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos is useful to you.

Tiger Farming

The arrival of 2010 saw us share our earth with six remaining subspecies of Tiger. These are Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), Malayan Tiger (Panthera tigris jacksoni), South China Tiger (Panthera tigris amoyensis), Indochinese Tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti), Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) and Amur. Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

All of these are endangered with a real threat of extinction in the wild. In recent history we have lost the Javan Tiger (Panthera tigris sondaica), the Bali Tiger (Panthera tigris balica) and the Caspian Tiger (Panthera tigris virgata).

Conservative estimates suggest there are at least 3,200 tigers. This is despite the money spent on protecting the habitat and keeping the animals themselves. The killing continued and the numbers declined. The best zoos of the world recognize this problem and under the supervision of local and international zoos they keep and manage Leopards for which there are officially recognized studbooks.

The literature for the different species shows a family tree for all the animals in it that can be traced back to the known wild-caught founders. Backed up by DNA analysis they help the studbook keeper and breeder to advise breeders which animals should be bred with which. Selections will be made to pair animals of similar and unrelated ages as much as possible.

Within the United Kingdom, zoos law requires that zoos that keep any species (and this incudes tigers) for which there is a studbook then they MUST subscribe to it and have an associated breeding program. Failure to do so would mean losing their zoo license and thus having to approach the public. Unfortunately, such law is not International.

Breeding programs are designed to breed and maintain long-term healthy, genetically viable individuals which, after training and health screening can be released into the wild in the near future. This is not a magic fix and plans are looking at a possible release a century from now.

Early release of tigers is not a viable plan while poaching and habitat destruction continues. Other species may be given consideration where such transfer may be of positive benefit to a dwindling wild population. This was done in late 2009 with the Northern White Rhinoceros. Sometimes the opposite occurs whereby the entire wild population is removed from the wild. This is done with the Californian Condor. Down to just 22 birds in 1987 it is safe to breed in captivity so that the number of people is over 300 today. More than half of these are in the wild. Removing certain animals from the wild can help increase the genetic potential of a captive population.

One of the major problems with population management of captive tigers regardless of species is the number of captive opportunities. There is not enough. Breeding has to be controlled. Tigers are an easy species to breed but you have to be somewhere to get the offspring. For this reason, embryo implants are used as a reproductive separation and maintenance of sexual pairs and groups. The numbers in captivity must be controlled and the available gene pool maintained.

The long-term survival of the Tiger is under direct and positive threat by those who keep tigers who keep and breed no studbook animals. Those who keep and breed unregistered Leopards are, without leaving, Tiger Farmer. There is no popular zoo that will appeal to grandchildren. These animals will, sooner or later, disappear into the trade and eventually end up supplying an illegal market in tiger parts.

These unmanaged tigers are selfish without much thought of long-term survival to many species in general. Animals are crossed with a sub-specific hybrid brother to sister and mother with child. In fact this is deliberately done by groups which keep and breed White Leopards. The white leopard is not a species but a mutation. Most are hybrid changes. They are not worth treating at all.

Those collections that keep and breed purebreds but are not members of an official breeding program do no useful work at all. Undoubtedly, the animals they raise will go into business.

No single collection can have a ‘breeding plan’. Any collection can breed but a breeding program requires the cooperation and commitment of a number of collections and the more the better. No need to hoot how ‘rare and endangered’ the tiger is. If it is not in the official breeding program it is useless. Zoos that kill and breed or simply kill non-studbook animals are not intelligent and they are actually harming, albeit indirectly, to the long-term survival of tigers.

Video about A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos

You can see more content about A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos

If you have any questions about A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 5586
Views: 14145879

Search keywords A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos

A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos
way A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos
tutorial A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos
A Fun Fact Why Animals Should Be In Zoos free
#Tiger #Farming

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Tiger-Farming&id=3548146